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When Robert Rust, Jr., DMD, cemented your crown in place it was intended to restore the tooth for a very long time. Unfortunately, there are times when something like a hard fall, blow to the face, or periodontal disease can knock a crown out or compromise the cement holding it in place. If you lose a crown you need to call Robert Rust, Jr., DMD, as soon as possible to have it addressed.

If for some reason you can’t reach Robert Rust, Jr., DMD,, there are a few things you can do to help manage the problem. If a fall or blow to the face loosened the crown and you have blood or debris in your mouth you can gently rinse the area with salt water. Otherwise you should let Robert Rust, Jr., DMD, perform any necessary cleaning.

If the abutment anchoring your crown broke off at the gum line you should see some or all of it inside the crown. In a situation like this, Robert Rust, Jr., DMD, will often need to perform a root canal to restore enough structure to cement the crown back in place.

If chronic problems with periodontal disease has given bacteria access to the seam where the crown is anchored to the abutment, it could compromise the cement holding the crown in place. In time this can cause the cement holding the crown in place to fail.

When this happens you should still see the abutment sticking out from your gums. It will look like a small nub of tooth or dull gray metal. The crown itself should also be hollow. Sometimes Robert Rust, Jr., DMD, can cement the crown back into place.

If you have lost a crown or one has broken off at the gum line you need to call Robert Rust, Jr., DMD, at to schedule an appointment.